Lower Nature Preserve

Some years ago, Bill Lower put in about 25 ponds to raise bait fish for his father Henry's bait business. Nature took over, and transformed a highly manipulated environment into a haven for birds, amphibians, and other wildlife.
Directions Site Visit

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What's This?

The best time to visit this 26-acre wildlife paradise is on a spring day, early in the morning or at dusk. Settle down next to one of the many small ponds and enjoy the concert, compliments of numerous birds, frogs, and toads.
History:
Bill Lower approached the Land Trust in 1997 about donating this unusual property. Some years ago, Bill had excavated about 25 ponds to raise bait fish for his father Henry's bait business. After this use was discontinued, nature took over, and transformed a highly manipulated environment into a haven for birds, amphibians, and other wildlife. Bill was concerned about its future, so he came to the Land Trust for help. The result is this fine refuge for wildlife.
Natural History:
Each pond is surrounded by nearly impenetrable thickets of brush and trees, providing ideal shelter, nesting sites, and food for non-humans. Some of the ponds have leaked and become wetlands. In addition, the western third of the property is a natural wetland, with cattails, marsh marigolds, sedges and hardwoods. A small tributary of Taughannock Creek meanders into and out of the property near the SW corner.

The entire preserve is teeming with birds, breeding on the property or just visiting-- wood duck, green heron, swamp sparrow, red-winged blackbird, downy woodpecker, white-throated sparrow, red-tailed hawk, ruby-crowned kinglet, and many more.
To protect the wildlife, much of the property is kept fairly inaccessible to humans. However, a trail goes a short way between the western-most two rows of ponds, and provides a good vantage point for viewing and listening.
Marsh Marigolds

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